Patti Lee

Once upon a time 
in a village by the sea 
lived a spry and happy girl, 
little darlin’ Patti Lee. 

In her garden she would play 
quite imaginary games: 
all her flowers sweetly sing, 
and her trees do dance with rain. 

She makes everyone so glad, 
makes them very very glad. 

In the cottage window sits, 
watching her while she’s at play, 
an old soldier who’s returned 
from a war far far away. 

In his mind he’s still at war 
fighting battles fought before. 
When he loses them again, 
sleep does save him with a snore. 

Patti Lee keeps at her play; 
a flat rock becomes tea tray. 

‘Cross the sea there still is war 
where young men are dying for 
causes that can save the world -- 
causes well worth dying for. 

One young soldier’s in the front 
thinking of his cottage yard 
where his daughter is at play, 
where rose petals are her cards. 

Being gone is very hard, 
O so very very hard. 

This young soldier and his dad 
people say are really mad, 
fighting wars so far away 
while a good life could be had 
working in the village streets 
as a constable, a cop, 
keeping home fires glowing warm 
as sweet Patti spins a top. 

Patti Lee keeps at her play 
all the while her dad’s away. 

When he comes back safe and sound, 
tales of war he will not tell 
as he plays out in the yard 
helping Patti build a well. 

All the pain he suffered there 
in a moment flees away 
‘cos he sees in Patti’s eyes 
the reward of all he’s paid -- 

Patti Lee can freely play, 
she can freely freely play.

He’s a Tiny Little Man*

He's a tiny little man
though he's over six feet tall
with a puny little job
but he acts like lord of all.

When he strides into the room
he demands from you respect
though to you he will give none
as he closely does inspect
every tiny little jot 
of the work that he demands,
and if things are not just right
then out flies a reprimand.

Yes, we surely all desire
in the rubbish him to toss,
but we never have the nerve
'cos that guy is still the boss.

* Original rap by Brian Grim (page 97 in Grim’s New Fairy Tales).

On a related note:

The Only Law That Counts Is Love*

If God came to earth, what would He say? 
And would He say it to our face? 
If we were faced with Him in all His glory, 
What would He say if He had just one minute?

     And yeah, yeah, what'd He say?  
     Yeah, yeah, make my day!  
     And yeah, yeah, yeah-yeah-yeah.

     What if God would speak aloud? 
     Would he draw adoring crowds? 
     Would he stand atop a cloud 
     Tryin' to get us to hear?

If God came to earth, what would he say? 
And would you want to give ear if hearing meant 
That you would have to forgive and love your neighbor 
And love people, yes ones who are your enemies.

     And yeah, yeah, what'd He say?
     Yeah, yeah, make my day!
     And yeah, yeah, yeah-yeah-yeah.

     What if God would speak aloud?
     Would he draw adoring crowds?
     Would he stand atop a cloud
     Tryin' to get us to hear?

Just tryin' to get us to hear,
A quiet whisper in our ear:
Do not judge lest ye be judged;
The only law that counts is love.

     And yeah, yeah, what'd He say?
     Yeah, yeah, make my day!
     And yeah, yeah, yeah-yeah-yeah.

     What if God would speak aloud?
     Would he draw adoring crowds?
     Would he stand atop a cloud
     Tryin' to get us to hear?

Just tryin' to get us to hear,
A quiet whisper in our ear:
Do not judge lest ye be judged;
Just tryin' to get us to hear,
Do not judge lest ye be judged;
The only law that counts is love.

* Same musical score as One of Us, originally performed in 1995 by Joan Osborn and written by Eric Bazilian.

The Good Samaritan*

The light that shone upon the face
Of what was once the human race
Is dimmed by anger, loathing, spite,
As righteous hate brings on night. 

We close our ears to cries beyond,
Which severs us from human bonds:
The very ties we desperately need
To be fully truly free.

So join me now, O we shall see
The dawning of authenticity:
We love and laugh and cry and share
As the Samaritan once did dare.

* Same musical score as “Mansions of the Lord,” a hymn written by Randall Wallace and set to the music of Nick Glennie-Smith; it was originally written for the 2002 film We Were Soldiers, and was performed by the United States Military Academy Glee Club.